Written by Fred Bailey

VR is transforming how surgeons train for real-life operations.

Health takes up 20% of the economy and technology isn’t far behind at about 10%, so new technological applications in medicine can have a profound effect.

In the past, surgeons used to train on realistic molded plastic dummies (not to mention cadavers).  Those were expensive and each model could only be used one time.

Surgical simulation companies can now offer Head Mounted Displays (HMDs) of human-specific anatomy to train surgeons and their teams, and even to educate patients on what’s going to happen in the operating room.

Data shows that VR training sessions, which can include tactile feedback, can reduce surgical errors by half.  That’s a significant decrease.

Surgical simulation companies can now offer Head Mounted Displays (HMDs) of human-specific anatomy to train surgeons and their teams, and even to educate patients on what’s going to happen in the operating room.

Data shows that VR training sessions, which can include tactile feedback, can reduce surgical errors by half.  That’s a significant decrease.

One Ohio startup uses a patient’s CT scan or MRI to generate a 3D model so the team can do pre-operative prep, including rehearsing complicated procedures.

Clinical applications of VR are already in high demand at medical schools.

An anatomy professor has observed that cadavers and textbooks can only go so far, noting that VR is a gigantic improvement on learning, letting students see the relationships between organs, muscles, and nerves, “zooming in to the microscopic level,” if they want.

Forbes Magazine quotes Mo Ben, CTO of The Body VR, remarking that “the medical field is receptive to disruptive new technology.  They see how flexible, personal and inexpensive it can be.”